Apple – Our Eye Tracking Review

March 11, 2010 3:47 pm

Apple – Our Eye Tracking Review



Our team  conducted an eye tracking review of the new Apple website for the February edition of Internet Retailing Magazine. The article can be read here: Apple Eye Tracking Article

We told users to think of somebody they’d gift an iPod to and then asked them to buy one directly from Apple online. Most users Googled ‘apple’ and accessed the UK home page from the natural listings. The rest just went directly into www.apple.com.

All users quickly clicked into the iPod + iTunes section and their eyes were instantly attracted to the different iPods from the top strip. The colourful iPod photography instantly drew the users’ eyes. All of the content about the various devices attracted different levels of attention, showing how users are easily drawn towards appropriate content. Amazingly, once the users had chosen an iPod, they struggled to move on and buy it due to the separation of online shop and content.

Users were expecting some form of buy button or a strong call to action. They checked the top and bottom of the pages and missed the secondary navigation that had a blue ‘buy now’ button tagged on the end. Users really had to read the  pages. Some tried clicking on prices and then they eventually found the links to the Apple online store.

For those users who had gone directly to apple.com by typing the url into the address bar, we noticed they were distracted by the pricing in dollars and then struggled to find a way into the UK store. Clicking on the USA lozenge at the bottom of the page eventually sent users to the UK home page, which looked just like the original USA page.

Once in the UK store most users struggled to choose from the iPod nano range since they initially failed to realise that they needed to select a model from the matrix of ‘select’ buttons. Users looked up and down the page trying to find traditional buy functionality. All users figured it out, but the journey from home to buy seemed to be more difficult than we expected it to be from Apple.

SimpleUsability have been providing expert eye tracking advice for the readers of  Internet Retailing Magazine since 2009.